As you now know, the Princess of Positive (yours truly), is an eternal optimist. You want to know my biggest flaw? Well, I’ll tell you anyways. I think all people are good and nice and kind unless they prove otherwise. D’oh! I’ve been called Pollyanna and have never been sure if that is good or bad. Does everyone use the word correctly when they reference it? Let’s look at a few definitions:

***Pol·ly·an·na (pl-n)
A person regarded as being foolishly or blindly optimistic.
[After the heroine of the novel Pollyanna, by Eleanor Hodgman Porter (1868-1920), American writer.]

***Noun: Pollyanna
1. An overly optimistic or cheerful person

***NOUN: A person regarded as being foolishly or blindly optimistic.
ETYMOLOGY: After the heroine of the novel Pollyanna, by Eleanor Hodgman Porter (1868–1920), American writer.

*** One who expects a favorable outcome or dwells on hopeful aspects: optimist. See hope/despair.

I guess it is a compliment. Certainly better than being called Debbie Downer (wa wa wa waaaa music inserted here). What say you readers?

3 Responses to “Pollyanna – insult or compliment?”


  • I found this from Merriam-Webster:

    Pollyanna: a person characterized by irrepressible optimism and a tendency to find good in everything

    That is a fine compliment indeed.


  • *I* think it’s a compliment, too – especially because I try to behave the same way. I assume, generally, that people are pretty good and forthright until they prove themselves otherwise. Unfortunately, in the past few years, it’s been getting, erm, progressively harder to do *sigh*

    I would keep to your “Pollyanna” personality and take it as a compliment ;-)


  • Only a Pollyanna would ask. ;-)

    /runs

    (NTTAWWT!)

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